Sightseeing in Russia – Church on Spilled Blood in St. Petersburg

Travel Moscow

St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow’s Red Square has 9 domes.

When you think of fabulous onion-domed cathedrals in Russia, chances are good you’re either picturing St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow, or the Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood in St. Petersburg.

St. Basil’s was built in the 16th century to commemorate the Russian capture of Kazan and Astrakhan, and Napoleon’s troops stabled their horses there in 1812.

Travel St. Petersburg

Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood  has 5 domes.

Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood, aka Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ, aka Church on Spilt Blood, aka Savior on Potatoes (explanation for that later, and why do the Russians have so many names for EVERYTHING?), is much newer.

But I think it has a more interesting story:

Alexander III commissioned the building in 1883 to commemorate his father who was assassinated on the site two years before – the “spilled blood” refers to that of Alexander II. The cobblestones where he was attacked are inside the church.

Alexander II was also known as Alexander the Liberator. Born in 1818, he became Tsar in 1855 and died in 1881. He may have been the biggest reformist since Peter the Great — another Tsar influenced by his European experiences.

Radical Reforms Engender Radical Revolutionaries. And Spilled Blood.

Alexander the Liberator, aka Alexander the Reformer.

Alexander the Liberator, aka Alexander the Reformer.

First, you should know that Alexander came to power during a period of extremely strict censorship. Criticism of the government was considered a crime, and socially, all Russians conformed to very rigid guidelines defined by class.

In 1855-56, he had a war to wrap up – the Crimean War, in which the Russians fought against several super powers including the Ottoman Empire, the French and the Brits. The Russians were defending the rights of Orthodox Christians in the Holy Land. Russia lost that one.

20 granite plaques along the base of the cathedral commemorate Alexander's reforms. Unfortunately they're written in Russian.

20 granite plaques along the base of the cathedral commemorate Alexander’s reforms. Unfortunately  for us they’re written in Russian.

But Alexander learned some things from the experience. After the Crimean War, he looked to expanding the railways to promote more commerce and bolster military defense.

In 1861 he emancipated the serfs – Russia was one of the last European countries to abolish feudalism. He didn’t just transform them into a peasant agricultural class dependent on landlords (sound like another form of serfdom?), but made them completely independent.

Former serfs were now able to marry without permission, to buy property and businesses, and to actually leave the property where they were born. They were also allowed to vote and sue wrongdoers. It wasn’t all good for the serfs (they didn’t have money to buy land in the first place; many were forced to borrow at extortionist interest rates), but it was a start.

Alexander II also sold Alaska to the U.S. for $7M in 1867. He realized it was too far away to defend.

In 1874 he instituted universal military conscription – all of Russia’s sons had to serve in the army or navy, whether they were nobility, gentry or peasant. Alexander also abolished corporal punishment and the branding of soldiers.

Sound pretty liberal for 19th century Russia? Perhaps he was too radical for the times, as Alexander survived five assassination attempts before the fatal one in 1881, and even that one took two tries.

Death of a Tsar; Birth of a Cathedral

Interior of Spilled Blood is filled with light.

Interior of Spilled Blood is filled with light.

On March 13, 1881, Alexander II was attending a military review in St. Petersburg, traveling in a bulletproof carriage. A member of the People’s Will threw a bomb under the wheels – the explosion killed one member of the party, and wounded many of the people on the sidewalk watching the procession.

According to my tour guide, the bomber was immediately captured, and Alexander II approached him to demand an explanation for the attempt on his life. He couldn’t understand why, after making so many reforms to better the lives of all Russians, anyone would want to kill him.

Church of Spilt Blood St. Petersburg.

Under the central dome.

That’s when a second assassin threw another bomb at the Tsar’s feet, shattering his legs, ripping open his abdomen, and disfiguring his face.

Alexander died a few hours later in the Winter Palace, just days from the 20th anniversary of the emancipation of the serfs. His plans for an elected Parliament, or Duma,  were just completed. His son Alexander III not only failed to carry out those plans for a new, more democratic government, he promptly destroyed his father’s papers. But he did build an amazing cathedral, which he never saw completed.

Church on Spilt Blood Construction

Architectural details of Church of the Spilled Blood

Narrowing this section of the canal to put the assassination site inside the church took over three years.

It took 24 years to build this monument alongside the Griboedov Canal, just off Nevsky Prospekt. Part of the canal was narrowed to accommodate the cobblestones where Alexander II suffered his fatal wounds, within the church.

Built in the Muskovy style to mimic St. Basil’s in Red Square, Russian revolutionaries looted and vandalized the church in 1917, the Soviets closed it in the 1930s, and the cathedral served as a morgue during the Second World War.

After WWII, the Russians used it as a warehouse for produce, which the locals called Savior on Potatoes. Restoration efforts began in the 70s.

Tips for Visiting Cathedral on Spilled Blood

Part of the iconostasis.

Part of the iconostasis.

1. Audio guides and group tours are available in several foreign languages.

2. There’s a tourist market outside of the cathedral, just across the street from the church’s ticket booth. My tour guide told me the quality of the merchandise was generally pretty good, but the prices were geared for tourists (outlandish by her standards).

3. On the opposite side of the cathedral, Griboedov Canal is lined with a multitude of shops and restaurants.

4. This is one of the few Russian sightseeing stops where I didn’t have to check in my coat.

Travel in Moscow – The 1812 Museum

I did not get nearly enough time in Moscow, but did manage to see parts of Red Square and The Kremlin.

Red Square - The Changing of the Guard

Red Square – The Changing of the Guard

Lenin is looking a little worse for wear. Wax museum displays look a lot more real than  he does. And don’t expect to spend more than a minute or two in his tomb.

It’s underground, Lenin’s glass coffin providing the only light. You can’t dawdle, and you can’t take pictures, plus you’ll have to check in your backpacks and purses before going in. Security guards hustle everyone in and out, lickety-split — basically you can expect to walk in, walk around and get out. So in some respects, that was a little disappointing.

Moscow’s 1812 Museum

One of my favorite places though, is the 1812 Museum.  Read “War and Peace” if you want an in-depth look at the War of 1812. It was long and preachy, but the novel gave me a good base for understanding what happened without having to delve into a history book, which is the 5th layer of hell for me.

When I asked my tour guide (hired through Tours by Locals, which I highly recommend by the way) about Tolstoy’s rather cynical views of the war, he adamantly stated, “Oh we can trust Tolstoy.” He went into an explanation of why, exactly, but it was just his very sure tone that struck me as interesting. Russian cultural pride is still running strong — more on that in a moment.

Here are some highlights from the museum, no signs in English, so I was happy to have someone to translate:

Depiction of 1807 Treaty of Tilsit.

Depiction of 1807 Treaty of Tilsit.

Napoleon and Tsar Alexander decide to team up, signing a treaty in the middle of a river at Tilsit– France agreeing to help Russia in their fight against the Ottoman Empire, and Russia agreeing to assist the French in their war against the Brits. Russia couldn’t realistically oppose Britain though, so relations with Napoleon gradually deteriorated.

Napoleon begins his campaign against Russia in June of 1812, and reaches Moscow that September. And now there’s a museum to commemorate the war, which the Russians call the Patriotic War of 1812 (don’t confuse it with the Great Patriotic War, which is how the Russians refer to WWII.)

RussianUniform1812museum

Russian army uniforms of 1812.

Russian Uniforms of 1812

Look for double-headed eagles adorning all things Russian.

Want Bonaparte’s autograph? Try stealing this specimen. And if anyone ever invents time travel, I’m making a stop to steal these seals…with these rings come great power.

NapoleonLetter1812

NapoleonSeals1812

Russian Cossacks were something like a cross between a pirate and a soldier for hire, though they had to supply their own horses, arms, etc. The army didn’t have a lot of control over them.

Nonetheless, they were given orders to slash and burn, leaving very little in the way of food and supplies for Napoleon’s Grand Army on their way to Moscow.

The peasants helped too, using what tools they had available, willingly burning the lands they worked, supplies they stored, and the homes they lived in. This is where we get into that wonderful cultural pride again!

The Russians didn’t call it the Patriotic War for nothing.

Handy weapon of the Russian Peasant

Handy weapon of the Russian peasant

Compare the above photo to French weaponry:

GenBerthierPistols1812

General Berthier’s Pistols

GenBerthier1812

General Berthier’s Ceremonial Sword

NapoleonsCannon

Napoleonic cannon. The man put his mark on everything.

You’ll see abandoned cannon everywhere around the Kremlin. They’re all neatly lined up of course, but you’ll be amazed at how much Napoleon left behind.

Watch Tower Cathedral of Christ the Savior

I found this interesting:

Behind this watchtower in the Kremlin wall, you’ll see Christ the Savior Cathedral.

This cathedral was planned in 1812 by Tsar Alexander, in thanksgiving of mother Russia’s divine rescue from the evil French.

The first version was completed in 1817, but the foundation was unstable.

A second version was consecrated in 1883.

Josef Stalin had the second cathedral dynamited in 1931, partly to use the site for a political monument, but also to recoup the gold in the dome.

After the fall of the Soviet Union, the Russian Orthodox Church obtained permission to rebuild, but it wasn’t completed until 2000.

You’ll see lots of marble and other materials from destroyed cathedrals in metro stations throughout Moscow. What a country!

Tips for touring the 1812 Museum in Moscow:

1. Most museums, and many other public places in Russia, require you to check your coat — there are cloak rooms everywhere. The 1812 museum is no different.

2. The 1812 Museum was also exhibiting Portraits of the Tsars, if you want to attach faces to all of the interesting historical stories. Portraits can get boring, but I found it was helpful to have some visuals to keep everyone straight.

Empress Alexandra, 1852.

Empress Alexandra, 1852.

If you want to be my friend for life, I suggest you buy me this dress. Don’t forget the head piece.

Travel in Russia – The Planes, Trains & Automobiles Edition

Moscow is grittier. St. Petersburg is more refined. Getting there and getting around poses some unique challenges.

Going to Russia – Flying Aeroflub

First, I made the frugal but brave decision to fly Aeroflot – they had the cheapest ticket I could find at the time.

At first I couldn’t check in online, as the Aeroflot site was under repair and a few weeks past the deadline for when those repairs were supposed to finish. Scrolling to the bottom of the page though, I found a link that allowed me to choose my seat and print a boarding pass. An Aeroflot attendant ripped it up at the airport, and issued me a new pass. Same seat, so I was content.

Got on the plane, only to find that the entertainment system was broken. No movies, no games, no map of our progress for 12 hours. My seat mate, who flies Aeroflot regularly, told me this happens a lot. Bring an ipad. He didn’t have anything, so we took turns playing Angry Birds on mine. Apropos, no?

Caution: Icebergs lure drunk passengers practically into your lap. Don't fly Aeroflot.

Caution: Icebergs lure drunk passengers practically into your lap. Don’t fly Aeroflot.

Food was ok, except for the iceberg lettuce salad and French dressing, which I haven’t seen served since the fall of the Communist regime. The chocolate mousse-like dessert was pretty tasty.  The orange mousse-like dessert was tastier.

The return flight was better, though the plane landed two hours later than scheduled. No problem checking in, watched a few movies, and the food was better. No French dressing.  The only other problem was the drunk passengers passing around shots – one of whom kept wanting to lean over our seats to look out the window.

Going Cross Country, or Just Across Town – Trains & Subways

Getting lost in either city is a given, especially when your phone dies halfway through the day and you lose Google Maps. The main problem in that scenario is in reading the street signs, since the Russian alphabet is a form of Cyrrillic.

A Green Line Station in Moscow. I believe this one was used for Communist Party events and as a bomb shelter.

A Green Line Station in Moscow. I believe this one was used for Communist Party events and as a bomb shelter.

For example, the nearest metro station to my hotel in Moscow was the Dynamo station named for Dynamo Stadium, written in Russian like this: Дина́мо. That doesn’t look too bad, does it?

Don’t get too confident though. The only metro station where you can connect with the Aeroexpress Train to Sheremetyevo Airport is Belorussky Station, which looks like this: Белорусский вокзал. ­­How are you supposed to figure something like that out?

Thankfully, a female police officer took pity on me and pointed me in the right direction after watching me study a map in blank confusion for a good 10 minutes.

By the way, Belorussky Station is on the Green Line, at the intersection of the Brown City Circle line. You’ll have to leave the subway station and walk around it to find the entrance for the Aeroexpress Train ticketing.

Russian literacy challenges for Westerners aside though, the subway stations in both Moscow and St. Petersburg are very easy to navigate. Better yet, you can hop lines all day on one pass, if you don’t ever emerge from the underground, for about US$1. Which is good if you’re perpetually lost.

Moscow uses a disposable smart card, which you can load up with one trip or multiple trips. St. Petersburg stations use tokens, which will be replaced with smart cards soon. Buy your trips at the ticket windows or via vending machines in the stations.

Subway stations in Moscow are filled with murals, statues, ceiling paintings...

Subway stations in Moscow are decorated with murals, statues, ceiling paintings. Didn’t notice the same in St. Petersburg, but also didn’t use the subway as much.

On the escalators into and out of the metro stations, stand on the right, and pass on the left. If you stand still on the left, someone will inevitably and not very gently nudge you out of their way.

The Moscow subway stations post maps strictly in Russian, until you get on the trains, which have maps labeled in both Russian and in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). St. Petersburg stations have maps written both ways in the stations and on the trains. Street signs in the Burg are also written both ways, though the IPA is in a much smaller font.

The subway stations in Moscow are works of art. Some of them held Communist Party meetings in the middle of the last century. Most of them are decorated from stone, marble and fixtures of beautiful churches destroyed by the Communists. If I had more time, definitely would have spent an afternoon train-hopping.

Long Distance Rail in Russia

I tried buying rail tickets to and from St. Petersburg online, through the Russian Railways website. Unfortunately, I couldn’t complete my transactions, which meant buying tickets at the last minute.

This forced me into first class on a Sapsan Train, which I loved. The attendant was fluent in English, brought me the Moscow Times in English, offered me American coffee instead of tea. It’s the only way to go, especially since it’s only a four hour trip.

Wikipedia says the Sapsan lines are Russian Railways' only profitable train service.  Considering the crowds, I find that unlikely, but who knows?

Wikipedia says the Sapsan lines are Russian Railways’ only profitable train service. Considering the crowds, I find that unlikely, but who knows?

Returning to Moscow on an 8 hour sleeper train though, I was forced into a “couchette.” Moral of the story? Buy tickets a few days in advance, and take the high speed Sapsan.

One other tip:  Google Translator helped me buy my return ticket. I just handed the agent my phone in which I typed First Class cabin, sleeper train, time, date and destination.  The agent seemed appreciative of my efforts, preferring that to trying to communicate via hand gestures through a bulletproof glass window. Too bad there were no first class sleepers left.

Getting Around by Car

Russian drivers are a bit crazy, but not in the same way as drivers in Rome or New Delhi. Russian drivers seem much more orderly, but they think nothing of pulling up onto a sidewalk and parking their cars on them, especially in Moscow. But then again, check this out:

 

 

Moscow River on the left, Kremlin on the right, with a small taste of Moscow traffic weaving in between.

Moscow River on the left, Kremlin on the right, with a small taste of Moscow traffic weaving in between.

I also watched three cars pull a u-turn from the middle of a gridlocked intersection…a feat I would not have wanted to attempt. Luckily, I wasn’t driving anywhere.  Traffic jams looked pretty bad, even by L.A. and NY standards.

Moscow is full of unlicensed taxi drivers. Just stick out your hand, someone will pull over, and the two of you negotiate destination and price. If you’re walking, they will pull up next to you and ask if you want a taxi. Traveling alone, I didn’t want to try it. Just say “nyet” and keep walking.

Licensed taxis look almost the same as Western taxis, except that there are no meters. I suggest getting a price quote before starting out.

That worked every time except once, when the driver quoted 200 rubles, but then told me it was 2,000 at my destination. He claimed language barriers. But considering he lowered the price to 1, 500 and then 1,000 when I told him I didn’t have the cash, I’m pretty sure I still got robbed. This happened in St. Petersburg. Maybe write down the figure to get confirmation before starting? Better yet, ask the concierge or front desk agents at your hotel to call a taxi for you, and to get a price quote.

Getting Around in Russia, Overall

1. When possible, book tickets in advance. Train tickets however, are nonrefundable, so make sure you ‘re sure of your plans.

2. Translator apps  and body language are your friends. When asking directions it helps to plug your questions into a translator, or to simply pull up a photo of the museum or destination you are trying to find. Add a questioning facial expression and you’re generally understood.

Mono Lake | Finding Tranquility in Half-Baked Calcium Carbonate

Who knew a million year old, salt lake without an outlet could seep into your soul like a halcyon balm?

Just reading about the alkalai flies inhabiting the shores, I wouldn’t have thought Mono Lake could provide such peace. But it did. And the flies won’t bother you—they’re too busy feasting on other things.

So if you’re anywhere near Mammoth Lakes (which is only about 30 miles south of Mono Lake), the entrance to Tioga Pass/SR 120 on your way into or out of Yosemite (about 13 miles north) or chasing ghosts in Bodie (about 25 miles northeast), you MUST take time to walk the South Tufa Trail at Mono Lake.

The Visitor’s Center, which is closer to the town of Lee Vining, is full of interesting information about the formation of the lake, the ecology, the history, etc. But even the signs there will tell you to get back in the car and head for the South Tufa.

There’s an access road a few miles further south from the Visitor’s Center off US 395.  State Road 120 west will take you west, young man…it’s the Tioga Pass Road to Yosemite. State Road 120 East is the access road you’ll be looking for. You’ll soon see signs for the Mono Lake tufa and shore.

This hike to the tufa is easy—it’s all flat. Yes, you can take your grandma.

Great Towering Tufa | Mono-nificent Sights

Tufa TrailMono Lake is about 65 square miles in area and less than 60 feet deep in most spots (though one spot measures 159 feet deep). It is one of the oldest lakes in North America, and it is three times as salty as the Pacific.

You’ll see evidence of ancient volcanoes when you visit…the islands in the middle of the lake as well as the Mono Craters around the lake are all remnants of volcanic eruptions.

Tufa forms underwater when calcium from underwater springs mixes with carbonates in the lake water.

Watery Wildlife

This is not a fishing lake, since the water is too alkaline to support our gilled friends. However, trillions of brine shrimp live here, billions of alkalai flies feed on the algae, and millions of birds migrate and nest here, feeding on flies,  shrimp and each other.

Believe it or not, the flies are kind of cool. First you’ll notice that the shores of Mono Lake are black by the water. It isn’t until you step towards the edge and a black, buzzing blanket lifts and resettles with every step you take, that you realize the you’re not looking at sediment, but at billions of insects.

The flies lift and settle about a foot away from you, not wanting to be parted from their algae dinners for very long. The buzz is incredible. The seabirds waddling the beach as you walk are amusing – beaks open, they skim for flies as the blanket lifts, with your every step. Instant, easy grazing for the fowl.

Mono Lake’s Alkalai Flies may be the only flies on earth that won’t annoy you.

Many of these birds nested on the islands, until the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power began diverting fresh water streams from the Sierras, and the lowered level of Mono Lake turned the islands into peninsulas, which created land bridges for bird and egg-eating predators.

Mono Lake restoration and conservation began in the late 90s. The water level still hasn’t reached it’s old depth, before the draining off of fresh water. But the ecology is reviving.

Summer in Mammoth Lakes – A One Day Tour

I had planned on seeing a lot more of Mammoth Lakes than I actually did. Unfortunately, my flight from Los Angeles had to turn back – a severe thunderstorm prevented us from landing, and I wasn’t able to book another flight back until two days later.

Take heart if you’d rather fly than drive though – a flight attendant told us that that was only the second time in her 22 year career in which her plane had to fly back to its point of origin.

Mammoth Village – The Adventure Begins

The great thing about Mammoth Lakes is that there are free shuttle services just about everywhere. However, I opted to take the Reds Meadow Shuttle, which cost $7/adult.

The Reds Meadow shuttle has stops at hiking trails leading to Devil’s Postpile, Minaret Falls, Rainbow Falls, etc.  There are 10 stops for this shuttle, and passengers can freely hop on and off to their hearts content.

So hike a bit, sightsee, then hop back on the bus for a little break.

The Reds Meadow Shuttle is about five miles from town and if you want to see Devil’s Postpile, you have to take it if you’re visiting between June and October. There are a few exceptions for private vehicle access, but the shuttle keeps down traffic on the one lane road, thus protecting both the fragile environment, and lollygagging tourists driving on unfamiliar mountain roads.

Besides, you’ll have more fun as a passenger – the shuttle driver will point out various landmarks and mountain peaks and you can devote all of your attention to the scenery rather than navigating steep hairpin turns.

To get to the Reds Meadow Shuttle, continue along the 203/Main Street and make a right on CA-203/Minaret Road. Stay on Minaret approximately five miles.

You’ll emerge from the woods and see cars parked along the roadsides – these spaces are free. As you get closer to the scenic gondola, rock-climbing wall, etc. you’ll find parking lots where an attendant will collect $10 per car. Go early if you want free parking.

Devil’s Postpile a Rock of the Tectonic Ages

Devil's Postpile a Towering Rack of BasaltWhat is Devil’s Postpile? It’s a national monument established in 1911, a Mammoth Lakes tourist Mecca, and a geologist’s prime example of ancient, columnar basalt.

It’s what’s left of a lava lake estimated to be about 400 feet deep. As the lava cooled, it contracted and cracked, forming the vertical columns. Freezing and thawing cycles over the centuries have sheered off the columns, creating the basalt pillars we see strewn on the ground below.

Signs around the monument instruct you to keep off the rocks – presumably for the same reason you shouldn’t run with scissors. Though I think I’d worry about rattlesnakes too.

Rainbow Falls a Killer Trek for Non-Hikers

The hike to Devil’s Postpile is fairly easy. The trail to Rainbow Falls can be quite another story. Supposedly, this walk is only 2.5 miles from the shuttle stop but it can get pretty steep in some areas.

On my way down I spotted a woman on the trail returning from the Falls on crutches. Then I noticed she was missing a leg. Her group had stopped for a breath, and just as I was passing heard her rally, “Let’s go! The sooner we get to the top, the sooner we can have a beer!” And off she clumped along, her friends surrounding her like a protective posse.

Now who wouldn’t find that inspiring?

Rainbow Falls crashes down about 100 feet, but it had shed its rainbow by the time I got to it. There’s a scenic overlook above the falls where you can watch the massive movement of water and ponder the courage of the crazy souls swimming in the pool at the bottom.

From this overlook you can take a steeper path further down and join the swimmers if you like. I debated. Then I debated some more. Then a few raindrops fell and I took it as a sign from the universe that I should head back to the shuttle.

On the return path, the trail branches off. The path on the left was the trail by which I came: slightly challenging, more or less uphill, but not too bad. The upper trail on the right had a sign for some kind of general store and camping area. I opted for the new trail, which nearly killed me because it was much steeper.

A quarter of the way through it, I was cursing the woman on crutches and all of her beer-guzzling friends.

At the halfway point I figured a knee replacement was in my immediate future, and I had visions of suffocating to death as I could NOT catch my breath. I took many breaks and made it back to the shuttle reeking of sweat and gasping like a fish. You granola groupies would love it.

Ansel Adams Wilderness Razed by Fire

Ansel Adams Wilderness, Mammoth LakesIf nothing else, the trail to Rainbow Falls and the Falls themselves are visually worth the aggravation. I can see why Ansel Adams was so smitten by his muse. But I have to warn you, you’ll see a lot of downed trees everywhere along the Reds Meadow shuttle road, and when you stumble across Adams’ Wilderness you’ll find even more.

The burned stumps and leveled trunks are victims of a forest fire that blazed in 1992. You’ll spot some new growth, but the devastating fire really took a toll on the landscape.

And that concludes my one day tour of Mammoth Lakes. I loved it, though my knees are still berating me.

Next up: a trip to Mono Lake, home of surreal beauty, a soul-soothing stroll, and billions and billions of curious little flies.

Mammoth Lakes – Reds Meadow Shuttle Map

Reds Meadow Shuttle Map, Mammoth Lakes in Summer

The Cartoons Are Cuter than the Concept

As reported by our friend, Hena Cuevas:

From the WTF Dept: This new travel “service” matches ATTRACTIVE PEOPLE with rich, lonely travelers willing to pay to have the beautiful companions accompany them to see the world, all expenses paid. Make enough of these trips and those frequent flyer miles let you earn trips on your own, sans wealthy, lonely dude. Pimping 2012 style, perhaps?

If our cartoon selves above could travel with the cartoon dudes they show, we’d have ourselves a deal!

Then again, you probably already know we’re partial to cartoons… that’s why we think this airline safety video is the cutest EVAH!

We’re hoping one of the people who posted on Vimeo is right, and it’s part of the advance marketing for a new comedy movie. We’ll see!

Mainz on the Rhine

I was just going through some old photos, and look what I found!  Pics from a trip to a German town called Mainz (pronounced like “mine” with a zzzzz at the end) from 2003!

It’s near Frankfurt, but we never did make it into Frankfurt itself, because there was so much to do in Mainz and along the beautiful Rhine.  Castles and vineyards and tschu-tschu trains! Oh my!

Me and a Castle on the Rhine

Castles in various states of preservation dot the Rhine, but they’re all pretty awesome.

Tschu Tschu

Same sound, different spelling for this “Tschu Tschu”!

Us with Castle and Flowers

This is where the Tschu Tschu went. Up a hill to this lovely place!

Castle Turret

It was July and the weather was lovely!

Gutenberg Museum

As a writer and the daughter of a printer, I have a deep love for Gutenberg…and his cool drinking fountain!

What do you call these cars that hang from cables overhead? I must have known that at the time, so was I thinking about the wine the vineyards would make, or the river Rhine in the distance?

Sydney and Marsupials

These are old photos from a trip to Australia in 2005 that I thought I’d better share now, while I remember where they are!

Aboriginal Art

The Opera House from The Royal Botanical Gardens

A cockatoo!
LOTS of cockatoos!

Antique Scuba Gear! From a shop in The Rocks – Sydney’s Old Town.

I have no idea what animal this is supposed to be, but this puppet (promoting a cell phone company) cracked me up! I feel much the same love as I once did for Saturday Nite Live’s “Toonces the Driving Cat”!

At Harry De Wheels in Woolloomooloo – With everything on them, these famously tasty hot dogs have the most unlikely combo of toppings: mashed peas, chili con carne, grilled garlic, cheese and tabasco sauce!

..

Kookaburra

Petting a Koala

Holding hands with a Kangaroo

Petting Kangaroos

Tasmanian Devil profile

Tasmanian Devil peeping

Hairy-Nosed Wombats – Cute!

Echidna

And finally, perhaps the weirdest of all Oz’s creatures: schoolboys in really silly uniforms!

2 Chicks Trip to Paris Part One

Arc de Triomphe, Paris, France

Arc de Triomphe photo by Lesli Latt

 

I’m not sure how it happened, but it has been almost four months since we went to Paris, and I’m still overwhelmed by the awesomeness of the experience.  I’ve been to Paris a handful of times before, but every time offers a whole host of new things I want to capture—and this translates into A LOT of photos. 

My other challenge has been in choosing how much to share.  I’m the type of person that takes notes along the way because I want to remember and share everything. I want my friend, whose birthday the trip celebrated, to have a detailed record as well.

Cartier on the Champs Elysee, Paris

Lesli in front of Cartier on the Champs Elysee

But I realize that the majority of people who are going to come to the blog don’t need everything, or even want it.  So now I will endeavor to offer you the highlights (which really doesn’t narrow it down much!).

Of the 3 cities we visited – London, Paris and Rome – Paris was my favorite.  It seemed to have the best combination of old world charm and modern comforts.  It is a city that runs smoothly without obliterating or being inconvenienced by its history.  

My goal was to show Lesli as much of Paris as she could see in 3 days, and still have time to sleep.  So we started with a quick walk around our hotel’s neighborhood. We stayed at the Tilsitt Etoile, very close to the Arc de Triomphe and one end of the Champs Elysee.  Then we napped and prepped for our dinner cruise on the Seine.

This served the dual purposes of seeing an overview of the city while getting a taste of the culture through food, drink and music.  This is a must for any short stay in Paris. There are a number of companies that offer cruises with varying levels of comfort.  We chose Bateaux Parisiens , and loved it!

Here’s where it took us :

Bateaux Parisens Seine route map 

Click here for the interactive Cruise Map and it’ll tell you all about each of the places!

2 Chicks on the Seine

 Here we are enjoying the cruise.  The photo of me was taken by the onboard photographer as a souvenir photo. I almost didn’t get it, but Lesli talked me into it.  Thanks, Lesli!

Below are some of the photos we took during the cruise– see if you can match them up with the map.  (See? Interactive and educational, aren’t we?)

Bateaux Parisens photo montage of Seine Sights

And here’s a video to give you a taste of the magic! 

Afterwards, inspired by the sights and sounds, and full of great food and plenty of wine, we hung around to take photos of the Eiffel Tower at night.  Pretty good for our first day in Paris!

PARIS ~ DAY 2

The next day we took a hop-on hop-off bus tour with the goal of hopping off at the Louvre.  The great thing about the bus is that they have running commentary so you know what you’re looking at, and a map to follow along.  Still, I could hardly remember, (and surprisingly, didn’t take notes!) so I did a lot of research when I got home to identify all the buildings I photographed. 

Paris Sights 
 
Please enjoy a little sampling of: The Eiffel Tower, Les Invalides, Le Grand Palais, Eglise de la Madeleine, Paris Opera, and The Louvre! 
 
I did further research after looking at our Louvre photos and video.  And I’ll tell ya why: the magic of art is that it evokes memories and emotions, it refers to something else, and that something is different for each person.
 
Just as much of modern art and pop culture refers back to the classics, when one’s first exposure is through pop culture, it works the other way too.  Lesli and I have always enjoyed each other’s pop culture references, but in order to honor the real artists and intent behind the works we captured on film, I did hours of research on the Louvre’s website and elsewhere.  (I also noticed that I’ve photographed many of the same things each time I’ve been to the Louvre.  I’m sure it would make for a great psychoanalytical study, but I’ll save that for another day.)
 
Ultimately, though that’s what travel ought to do – reflect ourselves back to us and then push us beyond what we know to discover more.  And the world is full of so much more!
 
Here are some of the Louvre’s greatest hits, as chosen by we 2 chicks:
Louvre Sights, Paris

Louvre's Greatest Hits

Phedre et Hippolyte by Baron Pierre-Narcisse Guerin

Adoration of the Magi by Bernardino Luini (or our name: Mohawk baby Jesus)
 
Mona Lisa by Da Vinci
 
The Young Martyr by Paul Delaroche
 
The Nativity by Fra Diamante
 
Penitent Saint Jerome in Ecstasy attributed to Luca Signorelli (or our name: Super Jesus flying high)
 
– I went kinda Joss Whedon and thought this guy was holding a little pet demon, but actually, he’s Portrait of a Man with a Statuette by Agnolo Bronzino.
 
Winged Victory of Samothrace (AKA Nike of Samothrace)
 
The Sisters of the Artist by Theodore Chasseriau
 
The rest of the stuff we loved can be seen in our video, below.  Don’t hate us because we’re pretending to be shallow!  And you can search the Louvre online for any I missed.
 
 Then we left the Louvre in time to catch the last visit by the hop-on-hop-off bus. 
Louvre Courtyard from inside the Pyramid

Louvre Courtyard from inside the Pyramid - photo by Malayna

 
 It was bright, so I donned the only sunglasses I had with me – my SPY sunglasses!
 
Atop the Paris Tour Bus

Cool sunglasses, and cooler (spy) sunglasses!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Here’s a sampling of some of the photos I took with said spy sunglasses.  See the earpiece? I’m like a secret service agent or something! 
Paris captured by spy sunglasses

Paris captured by spy sunglasses

 
Wait til you see what I got on the following day! 
 
Check back for Paris, Part Deux!

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